Book Review: In Defense of Food

A couple of posts ago I mentioned that I was halfway through Michael Pollan’s newest book, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto. I wondered if the author agreed with my sentiment that sharing a meal with friends and family is more pleasurable than eating alone. One of Pollan’s primary concerns in his book is that Americans have become so confused about nutrition that we no longer enjoy the act of eating.

In fact Pollan does point out that it is better to eat a communal meal than to eat alone, for a few reasons: By sharing a meal with a group, we tend to eat less, and we also elevate the act of dining to more than a mechanical process. Eating becomes about family, connections, and communication, something that Europeans such as the Italians and the French seem to understand a bit better than we do. 

But I am getting ahead of the point. Pollan’s book doesn’t only strive to tell us how to eat and live better; it also seeks to examine how we have arrived at such a confusing juncture regarding how and what we eat. Pollan explains how the problems of the Western diet and nutritionism have often simply gotten it wrong, turning us into a country where diseases such as obesity and diabetes are on a staggering rise. Just look at the once-revered low-fat diet, whose cancer-preventing values have been largely disproved.

I’m not going to give a summary of the book in this post, but I strongly recommend it to anyone interested in food and food history. Although I greatly enjoyed Pollan’s previous book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, which examines the problems regarding how our food is produced, I found In Defense of Food a more approachable, quicker read (and not just because it is a much shorter book). While some of Pollan’s ideas struck me as simple common sense, such as his recommendations to stick to “whole foods” such as fruits and vegetables, and to avoid as much processed food as possible, I still enjoyed learning about the history of nutritionism, the competing interests of the food industry, and the importance of the health of our food chain.

And I even learned a new word: orthorexia, which describes an unhealthy obsession with healthy eating. By sticking with common sense and reason regarding what I eat, I am certain I can avoid it.

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2 Responses so far »

  1. 1

    newhealth said,

    I absolutely love this book. My dad got me onto it and I absolutely agree with it. I was especially interested in learning about the global issues with Omega 3’s and Omega 6’s. And he even confirmed my ever growing perspective that if bugs won’t eat your food, then it’s not good for you….taking us back to the all natural, non-industrialized foods. This is my first comment as a new blogger. You have a great site!

  2. 2

    Christina said,

    I remember Pollan suggesting that perhaps one day doctors will measure our Omega 3 levels, in order to make sure we are getting enough. It makes sense to me! Thanks so much for the comment!


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